Root Beer With a Striking Level of Detail

hires_root_beer_6_24_1897

Anyone besides me see that name and think “High Resolution Root Beer”? No? Just me?

Anyway.

“A cool bottle of Hires Rootbeer on a sweltering hot day is highly essential to comfort and health. It cools the blood, reduces your temperature, tones the stomach. Hires Rootbeer should be in every office, in every workshop. A temperance drink, more healthful than ice water, more delightful and satisfying than any other beverage produced.”

I love me some root beer, but I call shenanigans on this ad from the June 24, 1897 issue of The Chatham Record. Maybe high resolution root beer is good for you, but standard root beer is just sodey pop, isn’t it?

That bottle is cool, though.

So’s this mug, and it is in highly disturbing resolution.

hires_in_highres_again

 

Free eBook Friday: The Confidence Code

The Confidence Code: The Science and Art of Self-Assurance—What Women Should Know, by Katty Kay and Claire Shipman

Confidence. We want it. We need it. But it can be maddeningly enigmatic and out of reach. The authors of the New York Times bestseller Womenomics deconstruct this essential, elusive, and misunderstood quality and offer a blueprint for bringing more of it into our lives.

Is confidence hardwired into the DNA of a lucky few, or can anyone learn it? Is it best expressed by bravado, or is there another way to show confidence? Which is more important: confidence or competence? Why do so many women, even the most successful, struggle with feelings of self-doubt? Is there a secret to channeling our inner confidence?

In The Confidence Code, journalists Katty Kay and Claire Shipman travel to the frontiers of neuroscience on a hunt for the confidence gene and reveal surprising new research on its roots in our brains. They visit the world’s leading psychologists who explain how we can all chose to become more confident simply by taking action and courting risk, and how those actions change our physical wiring. They interview women leaders from the worlds of politics, sports, the military, and the arts to learn how they have tapped into this elemental resource. They examine how a lack of confidence impacts our leadership, success, and fulfillment.

Ultimately, they argue, while confidence is partly influenced by genetics, it is not a fixed psychological state. That’s the good news. You won’t discover it by thinking positive thoughts or by telling yourself (or your children) that you are perfect as you are. You also won’t find it by simply squaring your shoulders and faking it. But it does require a choice: less people pleasing and perfectionism and more action, risk taking, and fast failure.

Inspiring, insightful, and persuasive, The Confidence Code shows that by acting on our best instincts and by daring to be authentic, women can feel the transformative power of a life of confidence.

***

Every Friday, we highlight an eBook from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

This Ain’t Denmark, People

January_29_1891

This advertisement from the January 19, 1891 Chatham Record seems to take the opposite tack from last week’s entry.

The 60-point type gets your attention: Hello, they’re putting it right out there, aren’t they?

A second look shows what the ad is really up to: “Opium and whiskey habits cured at home without pain.”

Oh, okay.

Free eBook Friday: The Serpent of Venice

The Serpent of Venice, by Christopher Moore:

New York Times bestselling author Christopher Moore channels William Shakespeare and Edgar Allan Poe in this satiric Venetian gothic featuring the irresistibly mischievous Pocket of Dog Snogging, the eponymous hero of Fool.

Venice, a really long time ago. Three prominent Venetians await their most loathsome and foul dinner guest, the erstwhile envoy from Britain who also happens to be a favorite of the Doge: the rascal-Fool Pocket.

This trio of cunning plotters — the merchant, Antonio; the senator, Montressor Brabantio; and the naval officer, Iago — have lured Pocket to a dark dungeon, promising a spirited evening with a rare Amontillado sherry and a fetching young noblewoman. Their invitation is, of course, bogus. The wine is drugged; the girl is nowhere in sight. These scoundrels have something far less amusing planned for the man who has consistently foiled their quest for power and wealth. But this Fool is no fool . . . and the story is only beginning.

Once again, Christopher Moore delivers a rousing literary satire, a dramedy mash-up rich with delights, including (but not limited to): foul plots, counterplots, true love, jealousy, murder, betrayal, revenge, codpieces, three mysterious locked boxes, a boatload of gold, a pound of flesh, occasional debauchery, and water (lots of water). Not to mention a cast Shakespeare himself would be proud of: Shylock; Iago; Othello; a bunch of other guys whose names end in “o”; a trio of comely wenches–Desdemona, Jessica, Portia; the brilliant Fool; his large sidekick, Drool; Jeff, the pet monkey; a lovesick sea serpent; and a ghost (yes, there’s always a bloody ghost).

Wickedly witty and outrageously inventive, The Serpent of Venice pays cheeky homage to the Bard and illuminates the absurdity of the human condition as only Christopher Moore can.

***

Every Friday, we highlight an eBook from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

First One’s Free

Brown's Iron Bitters oct 2 84

This lysergic looking advertisement for Brown’s Iron Bitters appeared in the October 2, 1884 edition of The Chatham Record with these words in bold type:

Brown’s Iron Bitters combines Iron with pure vegetable tonics. It is compounded on thoroughly scientific and medicinal principles, and cannot intoxicate.

On the other hand, many of the resources I visited to learn more about Brown’s Iron Bitters led with this sentence: “This product contained cocaine.”

Maybe it was hard to tell, given that it was delivered in 39% alcohol.

Resource of the Month: Proquest Family Health

2014-09-03_0927In January 2015, many of our online resources currently available through NC LIVE will change. One new resource we’ll be offering is ProQuest Family Health. This database includes magazines and journals covering consumer health topics such as sports injuries, women’s health issues, children’s health, food and nutrition, midwifery, eye care, dentistry, and much more. As with some other databases in NC LIVE, ProQuest Family Health gives you the option to limit your search results to only full text articles, only peer reviewed articles, and other specifications.

ProQuest Family Health is useful for nursing students and those in related health professions. It is also invaluable for families looking for accurate, in-depth information about a variety of health issues. As you probably know, the internet is not always a reliable source of information about health issues, particularly those that are controversial or little-understood. Families who are trying to learn about issues such as ADHD, diabetes, or just what to look for in a pediatric dentist will find that ProQuest Family Health offers a sensible and reliable alternative to much of the “chatter” you might find when looking for information on the world-wide web.

To access this resource, visit www.nclive.org. Scroll down and click on the “Nursing & Allied Health” link. Click on “ProQuest Family Health” (you will be prompted to choose your library and provide your library card number).

Click here to see a complete list of our new databases.

Free eBook Friday: The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry, by Gabrielle Zevin:

A.J. Fikry, the irascible owner of Island Books, has recently endured some tough years: his wife has died, his bookstore is experiencing the worst sales in its history, and his prized possession—a rare edition of Poe poems—has been stolen. Over time, he has given up on people, and even the books in his store, instead of offering solace, are yet another reminder of a world that is changing too rapidly…until a most unexpected occurrence gives him the chance to make his life over and see things anew.

Gabrielle Zevin’s enchanting novel is a love letter to the world of books—an irresistible affirmation of why we read, and why we love.

***

Every Friday, we highlight an eBook from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

Turns Matt Smith Into Teddy Roosevelt in 30 Days Or Your Money Back

voltiac belt

From the September 13, 1883 issue of The Chatham Record:

To men only, young or old, who are suffering from NERVOUS DEBILITY, LOST VITALITY, LACK OF NERVE FORCE AND VIGOR, WASTING WEAKNESSES, and all kindred diseases. Speedy relief and complete restoration of HEALTH, VIGOR and MANHOOD GUARANTEED. The grandest discovery of the nineteenth century. Send at once for Illustrated Pamphlet free. Address: Voltaic Belt Co., Marshall, Mich.

Here’s the cover of the pamphlet, for those not too nervously debilitated to read it.

Picture

Free eBook Friday: World War Z

World War Z: An Oral History of the Zombie War, by Max Brooks:

The Zombie War came unthinkably close to eradicating humanity. Max Brooks, driven by the urgency of preserving the acid-etched first-hand experiences of the survivors from those apocalyptic years, traveled across the United States of America and throughout the world, from decimated cities that once teemed with upwards of thirty million souls to the most remote and inhospitable areas of the planet. He recorded the testimony of men, women, and sometimes children who came face-to-face with the living, or at least the undead, hell of that dreadful time. World War Z is the result. Never before have we had access to a document that so powerfully conveys the depth of fear and horror, and also the ineradicable spirit of resistance, that gripped human society through the plague years.

Ranging from the now infamous village of New Dachang in the United Federation of China, where the epidemiological trail began with the twelve-year-old Patient Zero, to the unnamed northern forests where untold numbers sought a terrible and temporary refuge in the cold, to the United States of Southern Africa, where the Redeker Plan provided hope for humanity at an unspeakable price, to the west-of-the-Rockies redoubt where the North American tide finally started to turn, this invaluable chronicle reflects the full scope and duration of the Zombie War.

Most of all, the book captures with haunting immediacy the human dimension of this epochal event. Facing the often raw and vivid nature of these personal accounts requires a degree of courage on the part of the reader, but the effort is invaluable because, as Mr. Brooks says in his introduction, “By excluding the human factor, aren’t we risking the kind of personal detachment from history that may, heaven forbid, lead us one day to repeat it? And in the end, isn’t the human factor the only true difference between us and the enemy we now refer to as ‘the living dead’?”

***

Every Friday, we highlight an eBook from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

Free eBook Friday: Urban Homesteading

Urban Homesteading: Heirloom Skills for Sustainable Living, by Rachel Kaplan:

The urban homesteading movement is spreading rapidly across the nation. Urban Homesteading is the perfect guide for urbanites who want to reduce their impact on the environment and gain satisfaction from the fruits of their own labor.

Full of practical information, as well as inspiring stories from people already living the urban homesteading life, this colorful guide breaks down the lifestyle basics for any reader. It embraces the core concepts of localization (fulfilling basic needs close to where we live), self-reliance (re-learning that food comes from the ground, not the grocery store), and sustainability (giving back at least as much as we take). Readers will find concise how-to information that they can immediately set into practice, from making solar cookers and growing tomatoes in a pot to raising chickens on a tiny plot and maintaining the mental serenity of country life in the fast-paced city environment. This is a must-have handbook for city folk with a passion for the simple life.

***

Every Friday, we highlight an eBook from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!