eBook Friday: Paper Towns

Paper Towns, by John Green

When Margo Roth Spiegelman beckons Quentin Jacobsen in the middle of the night—dressed like a ninja and plotting an ingenious campaign of revenge—he follows her. Margo’s always planned extravagantly, and, until now, she’s always planned solo. After a lifetime of loving Margo from afar, things are finally looking up for Q . . . until day breaks and she has vanished. Always an enigma, Margo has now become a mystery. But there are clues. And they’re for Q.

Printz Medalist John Green returns with the trademark brilliant wit and heart-stopping emotional honesty that have inspired a new generation of readers.

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Every Friday, we highlight a title from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

Resource of the Month: Go Ask Alice!

Go Ask Alice

Have a burning health question you’d like to anonymously ask a medical professional? Want to see what others have asked in your situation? Then check out Go Ask Alice!, available through NC LIVE. Go Ask Alice! is a health question-and-answer (Q&A) Internet resource produced by Alice! Health Promotion at Columbia University, a division of Columbia Health.

Worried about the reliability of information found on an Internet website? Very smart of you to be wary, dear reader, but in this case you need not fear. Go Ask Alice! is run and supported by “a team of Columbia University health promotion specialists, health care providers, and other health professionals, along with a staff of information and research specialists and writers.”

To access this resource, navigate to the library’s website (www.chathamlibraries.org), click on Online Resources, and click the large NC LIVE link at the top of the resulting page. When you land on NC LIVE’s main page, you can access Go Ask Alice! several different ways. However, the easiest method is to click Browse Databases from the menu bar at the top of the page, then navigate to the resources beginning with G. You will not need your library card to access this resource outside the library.

Once on the site’s main page, you can ask your own question by clicking the Ask Your Question box. You can also see others’ answered questions by clicking Health Answers on the main menu bar and choosing the relevant section (such as Nutrition & Physical Activity). If you need assistance with this resource, feel free to contact the reference desk at 545-8086.

eBook Friday: Tricky Twenty-two by Janet Evanovich

Tricky Twenty-two, by Janet Evanovich:

Something big is brewing in Trenton, N.J., and it could blow at any minute.

Stephanie Plum might not be the world’s greatest bounty hunter, but she knows when she’s being played. Ken Globovic (aka Gobbles), hailed as the Supreme Exalted Zookeeper of the animal house known as Zeta fraternity, has been arrested for beating up the dean of students at Kiltman College. Gobbles has missed his court date and gone into hiding. People have seen him on campus, but no one will talk. Things just aren’t adding up, and Stephanie can’t shake the feeling that something funny is going on at the college–and it’s not just Zeta fraternity pranks.

As much as people love Gobbles, they hate Doug Linken. When Linken is gunned down in his backyard it’s good riddance, and the list of possible murder suspects is long. The only people who care about finding Linken’s killer are Trenton cop Joe Morelli, who has been assigned the case, security expert Ranger, who was hired to protect Linken, and Stephanie, who has her eye on a cash prize and hopefully has some tricks up her sleeve.

 

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Every Friday, we highlight a title from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

“Phonozenograph” Would Be a Terrible Nickname

The Phonozenograph

This article, from the August 16, 1988 issue of The Chatham Record, touts the invention of the Phonozenograph. The phonozenograph could purportedly pinpoint the location of any sound it detected, but it apparently never caught on (I could find nothing about it online,  under that name anyway).

Add the ability to throw sound and measure the echo, and this device resembles Radar, which appeared about the same time and had a much cooler name.

eBook Friday: The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende

The Japanese Lover, by Isabel Allende:


In 1939, as Poland falls under the shadow of the Nazis, young Alma Belasco’s parents send her away to live in safety with an aunt and uncle in their opulent mansion in San Francisco. There, as the rest of the world goes to war, she encounters Ichimei Fukuda, the quiet and gentle son of the family’s Japanese gardener. Unnoticed by those around them, a tender love affair begins to blossom. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, the two are cruelly pulled apart as Ichimei and his family—like thousands of other Japanese Americans—are declared enemies and forcibly relocated to internment camps run by the United States government. Throughout their lifetimes, Alma and Ichimei reunite again and again, but theirs is a love that they are forever forced to hide from the world.

Decades later, Alma is nearing the end of her long and eventful life. Irina Bazili, a care worker struggling to come to terms with her own troubled past, meets the elderly woman and her grandson, Seth, at San Francisco’s charmingly eccentric Lark House nursing home. As Irina and Seth forge a friendship, they become intrigued by a series of mysterious gifts and letters sent to Alma, eventually learning about Ichimei and this extraordinary secret passion that has endured for nearly seventy years.

Sweeping through time and spanning generations and continents, The Japanese Lover explores questions of identity, abandonment, redemption, and the unknowable impact of fate on our lives. Written with the same attention to historical detail and keen understanding of her characters that Isabel Allende has been known for since her landmark first novel The House of the Spirits, The Japanese Lover is a profoundly moving tribute to the constancy of the human heart in a world of unceasing change.

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Every Friday, we highlight a title from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

eBook Friday: The Wright Brothers by David McCullough

The Wright Brothers, by David McCullough:

 

#1 New York Times bestseller

Two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize David McCullough tells the dramatic story-behind-the-story about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly: Wilbur and Orville Wright.

On a winter day in 1903, in the Outer Banks of North Carolina, two unknown brothers from Ohio changed history. But it would take the world some time to believe what had happened: the age of flight had begun, with the first heavier-than-air, powered machine carrying a pilot.
Who were these men and how was it that they achieved what they did?
David McCullough, two-time winner of the Pulitzer Prize, tells the surprising, profoundly American story of Wilbur and Orville Wright.

Far more than a couple of unschooled Dayton bicycle mechanics who happened to hit on success, they were men of exceptional courage and determination, and of far-ranging intellectual interests and ceaseless curiosity, much of which they attributed to their upbringing. The house they lived in had no electricity or indoor plumbing, but there were books aplenty, supplied mainly by their preacher father, and they never stopped reading.

When they worked together, no problem seemed to be insurmountable. Wilbur was unquestionably a genius. Orville had such mechanical ingenuity as few had ever seen. That they had no more than a public high school education, little money and no contacts in high places, never stopped them in their “mission” to take to the air. Nothing did, not even the self-evident reality that every time they took off in one of their contrivances, they risked being killed.

In this thrilling book, master historian David McCullough draws on the immense riches of the Wright Papers, including private diaries, notebooks, scrapbooks, and more than a thousand letters from private family correspondence to tell the human side of the Wright Brothers’ story, including the little-known contributions of their sister, Katharine, without whom things might well have gone differently for them.

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Every Friday, we highlight a title from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

eBook Friday: The Secret of the Fortune Wookiee by Tom Angleberger

The Secret of the Fortune Wookiee, by Tom Angleberger:

With Dwight attending Tippett Academy this semester, the kids of McQuarrie Middle School are on their own—no Origami Yoda to give advice and help them navigate the treacherous waters of middle school. Then Sara gets a gift she says is from Dwight—a paper fortune-teller in the form of Chewbacca. It’s a Fortune Wookiee, and it seems to give advice that’s just as good as Yoda’s—even if, in the hands of the girls, it seems too preoccupied with romance. In the meantime, Dwight is fitting in a little too well at Tippett. Has the unimaginable happened? Has Dwight become normal? It’s up to his old friends at McQuarrie to remind their kooky friend that it’s in his weirdness that his greatness lies.

With his proven knack for humorously exploring the intrigues, fads, and dramas of middle school, Tom Angleberger has crafted a worthy follow-up to his breakout bestsellers The Strange Case of Origami Yoda and Darth Paper Strikes Back.

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Every Friday, we highlight a title from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!

Resource of the Month: ProCitizen

procitizen

Are you preparing to become a U.S. citizen?  ProCitizen can help!   ProCitizen is a self-paced preparation course that will help you study for the civics, reading, and writing portions of the naturalization test.  Through a series of 100 informative videos, plus practice exercises and quizzes, you will learn everything you need to know to successfully pass the naturalization test.

To access this resource, visit www.nclive.org and click on the Career, Jobs & Test Preparation category.  Follow the link to ProCitizen.  (ProCitizen is provided through Pronunciator and can also be accessed through that resource.)  The first time you land on the ProCitizen site, you will enter an email address and a password to create an account.  This will allow you to track your progress throughout the course.

Once you are signed in, you will navigate through the lessons by using the drop-down menus at the top of the screen.  The left-hand menu displays the section, and the right-hand menu displays the question number you are currently working on.  Work your way through the course by using the navigation buttons on the screen.  If your computer has speakers, you will hear a narrator reading out lessons, questions, and answers.

If you need assistance with this resource, contact the reference desk at 545-8086.  Happy studying!

So We Use Umbrellas Instead of Flak Helmets

rain Jan 21 1892This entry in from the January 21, 1892 issue of The Chatham Record shows how scary physics can be.

Why Raindrops Do Not Kill.

A falling body moves much more rapidly as it approaches the ground than it did when it commenced to fall. Its motion is, therefore, termed “a uniformly accelerated motion;” in other words, if a body being moving at a certain velocity at the expiration of one second from the point of time at which it was allowed to fall, it will be moving twice as fast at the expiration of two seconds, and so on. Experiments have shown that the rate per second at which bodies acquire velocity in falling through the air is thirty-two feet per second at the end of the first second after it has dropped from the hand; at the end of the next second with a velocity of sixty-four feet, and at the end of the third at the rate of ninety-six feet per second, and so on. The velocity of a body at any period of its fall may be ascertained by multiplying the rate of motion at the end of the first second by the number of seconds it has been falling. The velocity being known, the space through which it has fallen may be ascertained by multiplying the velocity of that period by the number of seconds during which it has been falling, and dividing the result by two. These rules only apply with absolute correctness when a body falls “in vacuo,” for the resistance of the air materially retards the velocities, especially when they become considerable, and when the body has great bulk in proportion to its weight. Were it not for this resistance, every raindrop, descending as it does from the height of many hundred feet, would strike with a force as fatal as that of a rifle bullet. – [Brooklyn Eagle.

eBook Friday: Cocktails for the Holidays: Festive Drinks to Celebrate the Season

Cocktails for the Holidays:
Festive Drinks to Celebrate the Season,
by Editors of Imbibe magazine (Photographs by Lara Ferroni)

Mix holiday drinks like a pro with the help of this book from the editors of the award-winning Imbibe Magazine. Cocktails for the Holidays features favorite seasonal recipes from bartenders around the world—50 classic and contemporary recipes for every festive occasion.

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Every Friday, we highlight a title from our collection at
http://e-inc.lib.overdrive.com
.  Let us know what you think of these selections, and tell us about eBooks you’ve enjoyed – we may feature them here!